Five Things to Check Out Today

This week’s post of Taste & See is coming to your screens one day early because I really want to encourage you all to check out point #3 and sign up for the free online course before time runs out! Just for the sake of sharing something different on the blog, here are five things that I would highly recommend you give a read/listen/watch when you have time during the week πŸ™‚

1. A Recipe

Sarah Britton’s Life-Changing Loaf of Bread. Seriously, go out and get the ingredients for this recipe ASAP if you don’t have them in your pantry already. This is one of the greatest recipes that I have ever tried for a ‘bread alternative’. It’s one that I go back to time and time again, especially when my tummy (which unfortunately isn’t a huge fan of traditional wheat bread) is craving some avocado toast, or even just something yummy to spread hummus or basil pesto on.

In her own words:

“It took me [Sarah] a long time to settle on the title for this post. Why? Because it’s quite a statement to suggest that a humble loaf of bread will change your life. I am willing to be so bold”Sarah Britton

The Life-Changing Loaf uses whole grains (oats), nuts, and lots of seeds. It is high in protein,  incredibly high in fiber, and is more nutrient-dense than regular wheat bread due to the healthy fats that it contains. It is gluten-free and vegan-friendly, and everything gets soaked (I touched on the benefits of soaking a bit over here) for optimal nutrition and digestion. 

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2. Talking about our relationship with food…

This article by Broccoli & Blueberries touches on something that I know I am prone to doing often: labeling foods as ‘good’ or ‘bad’. All of us are individuals, with different tastes, likes, dislikes, and relationships with the foods that we choose (and choose not) to eat. These individual tastes just confirm that food, and the nutrition it provides really is far more complex than just ‘good’ or ‘bad’.

Food is fuel. It is nourishment. It is pleasure. Food is essential to life, and we certainly do not need permission to eat it… Remember, you should not be valued on the foods you eat, or the exercise you do or the clothes you wear. You are valued because of your heart, soul, personality, drive, passions and talents.Emma Stubbs

3. Food as Medicine – an exciting online course

This free online course is being run by the Nutrition and Dietetics department at Monash University in Melbourne. Its aim is to introduce the concept of food as medicine and will explore how food can be important  both in illness prevention and in the management of chronic diseases. You will also learn about what’s in food that gives it the potential to improve our health.

The course is designed by a team of food & nutrition experts and is 100% evidence-based. In a world where nutrition claims are made on a daily basis by unqualified people, it’s refreshing to know that courses like this exist to share the truth about food and nutrition. As researchers and healthcare practitioners, the team running the course use this latest research to treat patients in practice, so you’re going to be in good hands if you decide to enroll for the course πŸ™‚

By the end of the course, you should be able to recognise which types of foods are essential for health and wellbeing, and how food can play such an important role in treating and preventing disease. Watch the course trailer and sign up here. The course starts tomorrow (24 October), so you better hurry up and enroll if you’re interested! I really want to encourage you all to sign up for it if you have time πŸ™‚ Here’s a little taste of one of the topics that will be covered in the course.

4. A Podcast

I listened to this podcast by Real Food Radio yesterday whilst making a lazy Saturday morning brunch. It goes into some of the details that registered dietitian Nicole Holovach touches on in her blogpost ‘Cholesterol Through a Metabolism Lens’. Cholesterol has had quite a bad wrap over the years, since scientists were first able to measure it in our blood. But a number of modern studies have indicated that at least half of all people who suffer a heart attack have normal cholesterol levels, and that after age 65 high cholesterol is possibly even associated with health and longevity. So, instead of looking at your high cholesterol labs with a sense of doom, take a look at the blogpost or give the podcast a listen and find out how cholesterol levels in the blood rise and when it becomes a problem.

The most important thing to know is that is that cholesterol isn’t this bad-for-you-you substance that it’s made out to be. Most people think, the lower your cholesterol, the better. If you could just get it down to zero you’d be in great shape! However, cholesterol is absolutely vital to the proper function of the human body. Your body makes cholesterol, regardless of your dietary intake, for good reason. If you had no cholesterol in your body, you would be dead! It plays an important role in digestion, Vitamin D status, hormone production and balance, and many other human body processes. You also need to know that high cholesterol isn’t a diagnosis. It’s a symptom.Nicole Holovach

The podcast and blogpost both touch on:

  • The different types of cholesterol-carrying particles, and what they really do inside of your arteries
  • Why the typical methods of measuring cholesterol aren’t a good representation of the bigger picture
  • The different types of fats, and how they affect your body overall (not just your cholesterol levels)
  • The benefits of cholesterol and why our body needs it to function
  • What really influences blood cholesterol levels
  • Lab tests and other markers that are useful to get a full picture of the effect that cholesterol has on the body
  • Methods to lowering your cholesterol in a physiologically safe way

5. Something to make you SMILE πŸ™‚

This video put a huge smile on my face. I couldn’t help but giggle. In a world where there are so many serious issues and it seems like every hour there is more controversial or bad news, it’s quite refreshing to see so much joy in a little child. 

 

Have a beautiful, blessed Sunday, and a lovely week ahead!

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